Thursday, February 27, 2014

Monktoberfest: Reconsidering Startups – Letter to a Young Programmer Considering a Startup

This post was originally published on the ServiceRocket blog. Included here is the lead and a link to full post.

Since he wrote his popular blog post, Letter to a Young Programmer Considering a Startup, Alex Payne responded to numerous questions from readers who were deciding whether to join startups, take jobs with larger more established companies, or stay in school. Alex responds to these questions by asking why the person wants to join a startup or start their own company. More often, the responses frequently come back with phrases like, “entrepreneurship is in my blood.”

In other words, more and more, people are choosing to start companies or join startups seemingly just for the sake of it or because it is a sexy career move. Payne is uneasy about these reasons for joining startups. “People are fulfilled by their work when they operate with a sense of purpose,” says Payne in his blog post.

Friday, February 21, 2014

HumanCapitalist Blog: The Internal Blog is 'Where It's At' In Enterprise Learning

This post was originally published on the HumanCapitalist blog. Included here is the lead and a link to full post.

At my company we have an internal tool that enables all employees to write blog posts and share them with anyone in the company. Our CEO blogs regularly and actively encourages others to blog regularly. He tells us it’s a means for building bridges between our five global locations and for finding expertise. I have come to share this belief, and now I cannot imagine working any other way.

In fact, I believe that internal blogging is such a powerful force in employee development that it must be part of any truly successful corporate learning program.

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

ServiceRocket Blog: Enterprise Software Training is a Must – Part 1

This post was originally published on the ServiceRocket blog. Included here is the lead and a link to full post.

Every enterprise software company gets to the point at which it begins to talk about the need to provide training to its customers. During the pre-internet and cloud software era, training was awful, consisting of voluminous manuals that nobody read, multi-day training sessions that no manager wanted to let his/her people attend, and computers that had never-ending compatibility problems that led to hours and hours of wasted time in these expensive and time consuming training courses. Thankfully, this straining experience could not and did not last.

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Monktoberfest: Marketing Your Tech Talent (your own or … )

This post was originally published on the ServiceRocket blog. Included here is the lead and a link to full post.

According to Deirdré Straughan, when you have a technologist who blogs, or otherwise communicates well, it is gold for your company, and yet there are still companies out there who forbid their engineers to blog. Forbid. Can you believe that? It is remarkable that in an age of tight talent markets, content marketing, and a culture of openness and collaboration that made Silicon Valley so successful, that technology companies treat technologists this way. The very people who make these technology company so great, are forbidden to communicate with the outside world.

Mindflash Blog: eLearning is Not So Hard, Is It?

This post was originally published on the Daily Mindflash blog. Included here is the lead and a link to full post.

You are a one-person training department mostly running live, classroom training sessions. You have even started conducting live training using a virtual classroom technology, which made things a lot easier for you. But scheduling and rescheduling and rescheulding and rescheduling is a drag. The way your company is structured, you need a solution that allows people to take training on their own time. However, getting started in self-paced eLearning seems so daunting, with graphic design, animation, and even custom interactions using javascript.

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Friday, February 7, 2014

HumanCapitalist Blog: Forget Tuition Reimbursement: Give Employees Access to a MOOC

This post was originally published on the HumanCapitalist blog. Included here is the lead and a link to full post.

Although the history of massive open online courses (MOOCs) is rooted in correspondence study courses and higher education (Open University started in the United Kingdom in 1969), modern MOOCs are evolving as a place for workers to learn new and valuable skills — skills that today’s workforce desperately needs.

MOOCs have quickly become more relevant not as a way to earn a degree, but as a tool for addressing the skills gap that many organizations face.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Research Shows 7 Ways to Make eLearning More Engaging

This post was originally published on the Daily Mindflash blog. Included here is the lead and a link to full post.

It is the nerd in me, but I like it when I can base decisions on evidence from research. So when I found this study, “What drives a successful eLearning? An Empirical investigation of the critical factors influencing learning satisfaction,” I thought it would be worth reading. Although this study was conducted in an academic environment, there are important lessons for any eLearning designer about what makes eLearning effective.

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Monday, February 3, 2014

ServiceRocket Blog: How Learning a New Technology Wins New Clients

This post was originally published on the ServiceRocket blog. Included here is the lead and a link to full post.

In December, we started work with a new customer helping them write a certification exam for an emerging technology. It is a new technology that is being used mainly by innovators, committers, and early adopters. The test is aimed at later adopters learning a new technology, and of course to help the company cross the chasm by extending adoption to a larger audience of technology professionals.

The technology is so new that the few books and websites that exist have wrong or irrelevant information about it. Even the official documentation has outdated sections. The technology is just moving so fast.

Saturday, February 1, 2014

Monktoberfest 2013: What You Know About Talent is All Wrong

This post was originally published on the ServiceRocket blog. Included here is the lead and a link to full post.

When Paul Ford stepped to the podium at Redmonk’s Monktoberfest 2013 to give his talk, The Web and the Quest for the Perfect Document, he had a change of heart. He did not want to give his standard, canned talk. Considering the audience, he didn’t think that would be the best way to go.

Instead, he decided to take a note from comedians, who work out new material in clubs all over the country, and read excerpts from a new book he is writing. At first, I thought, “Really? He’s gonna read his book? Aren’t I supposed to hate it when people read their slides? Shouldn’t I hate it even more if someone reads a book as his presentation? Especially an unfinished book? I should. I should hate that.”

Let's Review: Most Popular Blog Posts in January 2014

January brought a lot of interesting content to the LX Designer blog. The topics where all over the map, ranging from a gmail outage to an accusation. Here are the five most popular blog posts on the LX Designer in January 2014

We Are Looking at Knowledge Management All Wrong
In this post, I suggest we not worry so much about capturing knowledge of the departing. I post the question, “How do we want to capture the old way of doing things?”

Instead of Sending an Email…I Blog It
This is one of my favorite posts, as well. I am getting comfortable using internal blogs to communication with people at ServiceRocket. To broadcast progress on a progress. To announce milestones. To ask for help. To ask questions. To brainstorm. It is amazing how much participation and collaboration comes from an internal blog post. If you are not doing this, start doing this.

Gmail Was Down? Huh?
Evidently, the gmail outage on January 24 caused angst and frustration. Aaron Levie even posed a challenge tweet that someone has 7 minutes to disrupt email. I used Gmail for both work and personal. And I hardly noticed. Here’s why.

Poll Results: How Long does it Take to Learn a New Job
Let’s put it this way…it takes much longer that you are will to admit.

The Art of Writing Audio Scripts for eLearning
You want to write for how people speak, which is much different that writing for how people read.